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St. Charles Avenue streetcar in the Garden District of New Orleans.
St. Charles Avenue streetcar in New Orleans.
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Where to Eat Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line

Grazing along the iconic New Orleans thoroughfare

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St. Charles Avenue streetcar in New Orleans.
| Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Grazing along the St. Charles Avenue streetcar line is a brilliant way to spend the day. While there are scads of restaurants and cafes along Magazine and on cross streets, Commander’s Palace being a prime example, this lineup shines the spotlight on eateries either on St. Charles or within one block’s stroll. Good to know any time of year, but especially helpful when Carnival season rolls. Best of all, for the overindulged, the option to walk the 5.7 miles of avenue to aid digestion is ever-present.

For the best spots for a pre-Carnival parade bite on Canal Street, see here.

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Cooter Brown's Tavern

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The streetcar essentially culminates (ok, well it turns) at Cooter Brown’s Uptown, a boffo tap room with a million-ish different beers, chargrilled oysters, and ample portions of elevated bar bites. The burger with fried jalapenos is mighty tasty, same goes for fries slathered with cheese, bacon, and ranch dressing. Consider walking home.

The jalapeno burger from Cooter Brown’s.
Cooter Brown’s Tavern

Vincent's Italian Cuisine

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Fine dining Italian on the Riverbend, many dishes on Vincent’s menu reflects chef Vincent Catalanotto’s Sicilian roots. Beyond favorites like veal parm and chicken Marsala, the house special is seafood cannelloni, tender pasta stuffed with shrimp, crawfish, and crab simmered in a delicate rosa sauce — think the love child of red sauce and Alfredo.

La Crepe Nanou

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Enjoy a taste of Paris at Crepe Nanou, a lovely little bistro with sidewalk seating and a menu of French specialties offered for dinner Wednesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. From moules steamed in garlic and wine, a crisp order of frites on the side, to crepes oozing savory or sweet goodness, this romantic spot never disappoints.

Mussels from La Crepe Nanou.
La Crepe Nanou

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

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The buck-a-shuck happy hour is reason enough to pop into this family-friendly, often frenetic seafood destination along the streetcar line. Superior Seafood offers hefty portions of rib-sticking fare, like the crawfish mac and cheese and the shrimp and grits. Get off at stop number 24.

Superior Grill

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This popular four-location chain dishes tasty Tex-Mex and potent margaritas, with the New Orleans Superior Grill at stop number 21 on the streetcar line since 1997. From the diablo steak salad with grilled corn to crawfish enchiladas and shrimp and fish street tacos, Superior’s menu brings plenty to the plate.

The Delachaise Wine Bar

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Locals love the Delachaise wine bar, with its charcuterie options, fabulous goose fat frites, and terrific house pours. Also love that of the 350 or so wines offered, 36 of them are priced at $36 or less. The nibbles delight and surprise — like the shrimp Clemenceau, Bangkok style with Brabant potatoes.

Babin's Bar & Bistro

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Babin’s in the Indigo Hotel serves breakfast and dinner from a menu that includes a nod to several local purveyors, including Leidenheimer bread. Try the Abita root beer glazed chicken, crawfish tacos, or seafood gumbo over rice. Early birds can order that andouille frittata starting at 6:30 a.m.

Mr. John's Steakhouse

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If a good steak is on the wishlist, skip nearby Houston’s and opt for a local house, a city favorite at that. Mr. John’s is an Italian steakhouse with an old-school feel and attentive service that has been around for 30 years. Stick to classic cuts served medium rare, au gratin vegetables, twice-baked potatoes, and the perfectly-browned French onion soup.

Jack Rose

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Jack Rose is a swell spot, an art-filled oasis with seating options that include the leafy patio a stone’s throw from the tracks. Perfect for cocktails and bites or a celebratory feast, the menu offers small plates like crab and polenta with roasted corn and larger portions of entrees including a saltimbocca-treated veal chop with prosciutto and sage. Stay for outstanding live jazz at the Bayou Bar next door.

Inside Hot Tin.
Neil Alexander/Jack Rose

Please-U-Restaurant

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This place isn’t being cheeky retro, it actually is a vintage breakfast and lunch place that dates back to 1946. Please-U-Restaurant’s legion of fans adores the wide array of omelets — including oyster — and po’boys including the crowd-pleasing french fries and gravy. Easy on the budget too. Open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., closed Sunday.

Tito's Ceviche & Pisco

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This new multi-level outpost of the original Tito’s Ceviche and Pisco Peruvian restaurant on Magazine Street is a bright spot in what used to be the Saint Charles Tavern. Founders Tatiana and Juan Lock are excited to bring authentic flavors to the Garden District, dishes like various types of composed raw seafood, and cooked specialties like tallarin verde, a hanger steak with garlicky pesto linguine. A pair of pretty bars specialize in pisco, the clear, strong brandy that is the national spirit of Peru.

Maïs Arepas

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Maïs Arepas opened in Central City in 2012, bringing a vital restaurant to the neighborhood that pulled the culinary curtains back on authentic Colombian cuisine. Owner David Mantilla puts arepas front and center with a lineup of 10 sandwiches, winning combos like shredded chicken with avocados, green peppers, and lime. Get the sampler app, it’s delicious.

Bandeja paisa from Mais Arepas.
Maïs Arepas

Pluck Wine Bar & Restaurant

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Pluck is the brainchild of sommelier Skye LaTorre, who pairs a spunky menu of Spanish, Creole, and global flavors with her devotion to the grape. Pluck offers indoor and courtyard dining at 722 Girod Street just off St. Charles Avenue. This place flies under the radar but deserves attention for its creative menu — developed by chef consultant Heathcliffe Hailey — and thoughtful approach to wine drinking and education.

Herbsaint

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The flagship of the Link Restaurant Group, Herbsaint has graced St. Charles Avenue since 2000. Definitely the prettiest of Link’s restaurants, this welcoming light-filled space spotlights chef Tyler Spreen’s contemporary, seasonal French-Southern cuisine, informed by local farmers and fishermen. The cornmeal fried oysters, muscovy duck leg confit with dirty rice, and duck, tasso and andouille gumbo are just a few lip-smacking options.

Inside Herbsaint.
Bill Addison/Eater

Luke is a bright spot on St. Charles Avenue, a Creole-inspired brasserie overflowing with oysters raw and charbroiled, fresh composed salads, fries for dipping, and an Alsatian tarte studded with bacon and oozing Emmenthaler cheese. Perfect for pre or post-game or theater, Luke serves the gamut of etouffee, moules frites, and schnitzel, each dish basking in seasonal finery.

Trenasse

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This sleeper in the hip pocket of the Intercontinental Hotel is a gem worth discovering. From its housemade beignets at brunch to oversized po’boys and a riff on a muffuletta that includes house-smoked pastrami and homemade pickled vedge, Trenasse delivers. The cauliflower steak with Saint Andre cheese and pistachio pesto is just one inspired vegetarian option.

The Muffi from Trenasse.
Trenasse

Cooter Brown's Tavern

The streetcar essentially culminates (ok, well it turns) at Cooter Brown’s Uptown, a boffo tap room with a million-ish different beers, chargrilled oysters, and ample portions of elevated bar bites. The burger with fried jalapenos is mighty tasty, same goes for fries slathered with cheese, bacon, and ranch dressing. Consider walking home.

The jalapeno burger from Cooter Brown’s.
Cooter Brown’s Tavern

Vincent's Italian Cuisine

Fine dining Italian on the Riverbend, many dishes on Vincent’s menu reflects chef Vincent Catalanotto’s Sicilian roots. Beyond favorites like veal parm and chicken Marsala, the house special is seafood cannelloni, tender pasta stuffed with shrimp, crawfish, and crab simmered in a delicate rosa sauce — think the love child of red sauce and Alfredo.

La Crepe Nanou

Enjoy a taste of Paris at Crepe Nanou, a lovely little bistro with sidewalk seating and a menu of French specialties offered for dinner Wednesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. From moules steamed in garlic and wine, a crisp order of frites on the side, to crepes oozing savory or sweet goodness, this romantic spot never disappoints.

Mussels from La Crepe Nanou.
La Crepe Nanou

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

The buck-a-shuck happy hour is reason enough to pop into this family-friendly, often frenetic seafood destination along the streetcar line. Superior Seafood offers hefty portions of rib-sticking fare, like the crawfish mac and cheese and the shrimp and grits. Get off at stop number 24.

Superior Grill

This popular four-location chain dishes tasty Tex-Mex and potent margaritas, with the New Orleans Superior Grill at stop number 21 on the streetcar line since 1997. From the diablo steak salad with grilled corn to crawfish enchiladas and shrimp and fish street tacos, Superior’s menu brings plenty to the plate.

The Delachaise Wine Bar

Locals love the Delachaise wine bar, with its charcuterie options, fabulous goose fat frites, and terrific house pours. Also love that of the 350 or so wines offered, 36 of them are priced at $36 or less. The nibbles delight and surprise — like the shrimp Clemenceau, Bangkok style with Brabant potatoes.

Babin's Bar & Bistro

Babin’s in the Indigo Hotel serves breakfast and dinner from a menu that includes a nod to several local purveyors, including Leidenheimer bread. Try the Abita root beer glazed chicken, crawfish tacos, or seafood gumbo over rice. Early birds can order that andouille frittata starting at 6:30 a.m.

Mr. John's Steakhouse

If a good steak is on the wishlist, skip nearby Houston’s and opt for a local house, a city favorite at that. Mr. John’s is an Italian steakhouse with an old-school feel and attentive service that has been around for 30 years. Stick to classic cuts served medium rare, au gratin vegetables, twice-baked potatoes, and the perfectly-browned French onion soup.

Jack Rose

Jack Rose is a swell spot, an art-filled oasis with seating options that include the leafy patio a stone’s throw from the tracks. Perfect for cocktails and bites or a celebratory feast, the menu offers small plates like crab and polenta with roasted corn and larger portions of entrees including a saltimbocca-treated veal chop with prosciutto and sage. Stay for outstanding live jazz at the Bayou Bar next door.

Inside Hot Tin.
Neil Alexander/Jack Rose

Please-U-Restaurant

This place isn’t being cheeky retro, it actually is a vintage breakfast and lunch place that dates back to 1946. Please-U-Restaurant’s legion of fans adores the wide array of omelets — including oyster — and po’boys including the crowd-pleasing french fries and gravy. Easy on the budget too. Open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., closed Sunday.

Tito's Ceviche & Pisco

This new multi-level outpost of the original Tito’s Ceviche and Pisco Peruvian restaurant on Magazine Street is a bright spot in what used to be the Saint Charles Tavern. Founders Tatiana and Juan Lock are excited to bring authentic flavors to the Garden District, dishes like various types of composed raw seafood, and cooked specialties like tallarin verde, a hanger steak with garlicky pesto linguine. A pair of pretty bars specialize in pisco, the clear, strong brandy that is the national spirit of Peru.

Maïs Arepas

Maïs Arepas opened in Central City in 2012, bringing a vital restaurant to the neighborhood that pulled the culinary curtains back on authentic Colombian cuisine. Owner David Mantilla puts arepas front and center with a lineup of 10 sandwiches, winning combos like shredded chicken with avocados, green peppers, and lime. Get the sampler app, it’s delicious.

Bandeja paisa from Mais Arepas.
Maïs Arepas

Pluck Wine Bar & Restaurant

Pluck is the brainchild of sommelier Skye LaTorre, who pairs a spunky menu of Spanish, Creole, and global flavors with her devotion to the grape. Pluck offers indoor and courtyard dining at 722 Girod Street just off St. Charles Avenue. This place flies under the radar but deserves attention for its creative menu — developed by chef consultant Heathcliffe Hailey — and thoughtful approach to wine drinking and education.

Herbsaint

The flagship of the Link Restaurant Group, Herbsaint has graced St. Charles Avenue since 2000. Definitely the prettiest of Link’s restaurants, this welcoming light-filled space spotlights chef Tyler Spreen’s contemporary, seasonal French-Southern cuisine, informed by local farmers and fishermen. The cornmeal fried oysters, muscovy duck leg confit with dirty rice, and duck, tasso and andouille gumbo are just a few lip-smacking options.

Inside Herbsaint.
Bill Addison/Eater

Luke

Luke is a bright spot on St. Charles Avenue, a Creole-inspired brasserie overflowing with oysters raw and charbroiled, fresh composed salads, fries for dipping, and an Alsatian tarte studded with bacon and oozing Emmenthaler cheese. Perfect for pre or post-game or theater, Luke serves the gamut of etouffee, moules frites, and schnitzel, each dish basking in seasonal finery.

Related Maps

Trenasse

This sleeper in the hip pocket of the Intercontinental Hotel is a gem worth discovering. From its housemade beignets at brunch to oversized po’boys and a riff on a muffuletta that includes house-smoked pastrami and homemade pickled vedge, Trenasse delivers. The cauliflower steak with Saint Andre cheese and pistachio pesto is just one inspired vegetarian option.

The Muffi from Trenasse.
Trenasse

Related Maps