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A two-story building with wraparound porches on both levels; crows of peopled around it on the street, celebrating Mardi Gras.
Brunches, beignets, and barbecue platters galore this Mardi Gras.
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Where to Eat on Mardi Gras Day in New Orleans

The best places to dine amid Mardi Gras revelry this year

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Brunches, beignets, and barbecue platters galore this Mardi Gras.
| Getty Images

Bless their collective hearts. A big shout out to the restaurant managers, cooks, servers and bartenders who forgo their personal Mardi Gras revelry to take care of the rest of us. These restaurants are open, usually with limited menus, to feed guests along or close to the parade route. For New Orleanians with zero interest in planning ahead, these are some of the restaurants open on Mardi Gras Day. Some offer wrist bands for bathroom use (it’s worth it). Please be kind, tip well and often, and lean into the spirit of Fat Tuesday as Ash Wednesday looms large.

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Crescent City Steak House

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A trove of Fat Tuesday regulars command the tables every year at this family owned steakhouse, a beacon of sizzling beef since 1934. But Crescent City Steaks’ convivial atmosphere and warm welcome is worth the wait — not to mention the old-school vibe and rib eyes sizzling with butter.

Marie's Bar

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Just about any amount of alcohol can be countered by a double-slap burger at Marie’s Bar and Kitchen. Chef and owner Chad Barlow grills the juiciest burgers, despite cooking them medium well, thanks to a secret ingredient. (Hint: butter). Dressed with special sauce inspired by In-N-Out Burger’s, these burgers take care of business.

Coop's Place

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At the top of so many cheap eats’ lists, Coop’s, a Decatur street grub hub since 1983, has zero pretension. Although service has a rep for being snarky, really, it’s just fine, with busy servers and bartenders delivering Nola staples like fried chicken, red beans, and tasty jambalaya. Know your order when asked please — it’s going to be a busy day.

MRB Bar & Kitchen

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MRB, with its rear courtyard where live music often prevails, is a hidden gem ideal for taking a load off and having a bite. Order at the back kitchen window for raw and char-grilled oysters and sandwiches (think Philly steak; turkey neck po’boys; even a vegetarian sloppy Joe). Drinks are cheap and potent.

 

The Bombay Club

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Duck out of the madness into this martini-drenched oasis on Conti Street in the Quarter. The Bombay Club is open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Nibble on the likes of tandoori fish sliders and buttermilk fried chicken sandwiches — but the dirty martini salad may be the best pairing with its liquid namesake.

Tujagues Restaurant

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Despite is 2020 move from its original location at 823 Decatur Street to 429, Tujague’s carries the baton as the oldest stand-up bar in America. Brunch will be offered 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an abbreviated menu served til closing: think wedge salads; filet mignon; fish almandine. Have a grasshopper on the way out — the frothy minty dreamsicle was invented here.

Criollo

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Criollo at the Monteleone offers breakfast and brunch (think eggs Benedict; avocado toast; beignets) from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 am and lunch (think crab cakes; grillades and grits; chicken club sandwiches) from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Try to get a seat at the Carousel Bar, which stays open until midnight, although it’s as likely as grasping the Holy Grail on Mardi Gras day.

Copper Vine

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This handsome, wine-forward bistro will open early, at 10:30 a.m., on Mardi Gras Day. An all-day brunch along with dinner service from chef Amy Mehrtens continues until 9 p.m. Copper VIne’s brunch is substantial, offering short rib ragu with pappardelle and filet mignon with frites besides the usual egg dishes.

Commons Club New Orleans

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Chef Chris Borges presides over the Commons Club, the cheeky restaurant space in the Virgin Hotel, with its peekaboo-themed shag room and art-filled setting for conversation and noshing. The menu, which includes gluten-free and vegetarian options, ranges from spaghetti with lamb meatballs to roast chicken and barbecue shrimp.

Devil Moon Barbecue

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When only smoked meat will do, Devil Moon can oblige. Start with cracklins and move into slabs of spare ribs and platters piled high with brisket, with red beans, and greens, and Frito pie on the side. Devil Moon offers plenty of house-made brews for pairing.

Seaworthy

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Seaworthy, an Ace Hotel restaurant in a sweet Creole cottage on Carondolet Street, offers sustainably harvested oysters, local fish and game, and creative cocktails, a fine trifecta for Mardi Gras Day. With a dining room that might as well be carved from the prow of a wooden ship, Seaworthy is an intimate port in the Carnival storm.

Cooter Brown's Tavern

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For parade-goers staying Uptown, Cooter Brown’s is a sports bar with darn good eats. The limited Mardi Gras menu precludes the usual raw oysters, instead putting the emphasis on fried seafood, burgers, po’boys, and local comfort fare, including red beans and jambalaya. There’s a veggie burger and cheese fries for the meat-averse.

Avenue Pub

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Mardi Gras central since it opened in 1987, Avenue Pub is now owned by the guys behind Blue Oak Barbecue, who know better than to mess with tradition. There’s a $10 wrist band for the bathroom and a menu that ranges from fish tacos and fried shrimp to boudin balls and loaded tots. On the drink side, besides 40 beers on tap, there will be frozen Irish coffee and jello shots to keep the party going.

Bayou Bar

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There are so many reasons to love Bayou Bar in the Pontchartrain Hotel, from the intimate pub’s outstanding live jazz to its menu of excellent American eats, including a fine burger, satisfying red beans, dirty rice and fried catfish on a bun. Bayou Bar will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mardi Gras day. The hotel’s coffee shop,  Silver Whistle, will be serving coffee and breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

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Ground zero for parades, Superior Seafood is mobbed even on an average Tuesday. Expect droves of seafood eaters, many who reserve tables far in advance, dining within gawking distance of the action. The restaurant is known for fresh oysters and seafood, which feature in dishes like shrimp and grits and crab bisque.

Good Catch Thai Urban Bistro

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Good Catch Nola is the latest from chef Aom Srisuk, who opened Pomelo Uptown with her husband Frankie Weinberg in late 2021. The larger restaurant in the CBD will be open for parade goers craving dishes like flavorful pad Thai with shrimp and scallops and seafood tom yum ramen. Unlike Pomelo, there’s a full bar.

Mother's

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Mother’s Restaurant, smack dab on the end of the parade route for many krewes, will be dishing strong drinks and huge portions of New Orleans comfort food from 7 am to 10 pm Mardi Gras Day. The debris po’boy is one specialty, or order the meaty bits piled on a plate of eggs. Nothing fancy to see here, but lots of options to banish the hangries.

Chef Charly Pierre is opening his winning Haitian restaurant Fritai, situated right in the heart of the Zulu festivities, from 8 am to 5 pm on Mardi Gras Day. For sure to try the addictive fried wings, marinated in epis, his country’s national spice blend bright with garlic, green herbs, peppers and vinegar. Add the Creole hot sauce for extra kick. If the crab mac and cheese is on the limited menu, don’t miss it.

Crescent City Steak House

A trove of Fat Tuesday regulars command the tables every year at this family owned steakhouse, a beacon of sizzling beef since 1934. But Crescent City Steaks’ convivial atmosphere and warm welcome is worth the wait — not to mention the old-school vibe and rib eyes sizzling with butter.

Marie's Bar

Just about any amount of alcohol can be countered by a double-slap burger at Marie’s Bar and Kitchen. Chef and owner Chad Barlow grills the juiciest burgers, despite cooking them medium well, thanks to a secret ingredient. (Hint: butter). Dressed with special sauce inspired by In-N-Out Burger’s, these burgers take care of business.

Coop's Place

At the top of so many cheap eats’ lists, Coop’s, a Decatur street grub hub since 1983, has zero pretension. Although service has a rep for being snarky, really, it’s just fine, with busy servers and bartenders delivering Nola staples like fried chicken, red beans, and tasty jambalaya. Know your order when asked please — it’s going to be a busy day.

MRB Bar & Kitchen

MRB, with its rear courtyard where live music often prevails, is a hidden gem ideal for taking a load off and having a bite. Order at the back kitchen window for raw and char-grilled oysters and sandwiches (think Philly steak; turkey neck po’boys; even a vegetarian sloppy Joe). Drinks are cheap and potent.

 

The Bombay Club

Duck out of the madness into this martini-drenched oasis on Conti Street in the Quarter. The Bombay Club is open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Nibble on the likes of tandoori fish sliders and buttermilk fried chicken sandwiches — but the dirty martini salad may be the best pairing with its liquid namesake.

Tujagues Restaurant

Despite is 2020 move from its original location at 823 Decatur Street to 429, Tujague’s carries the baton as the oldest stand-up bar in America. Brunch will be offered 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an abbreviated menu served til closing: think wedge salads; filet mignon; fish almandine. Have a grasshopper on the way out — the frothy minty dreamsicle was invented here.

Criollo

Criollo at the Monteleone offers breakfast and brunch (think eggs Benedict; avocado toast; beignets) from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 am and lunch (think crab cakes; grillades and grits; chicken club sandwiches) from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Try to get a seat at the Carousel Bar, which stays open until midnight, although it’s as likely as grasping the Holy Grail on Mardi Gras day.

Copper Vine

This handsome, wine-forward bistro will open early, at 10:30 a.m., on Mardi Gras Day. An all-day brunch along with dinner service from chef Amy Mehrtens continues until 9 p.m. Copper VIne’s brunch is substantial, offering short rib ragu with pappardelle and filet mignon with frites besides the usual egg dishes.

Commons Club New Orleans

Chef Chris Borges presides over the Commons Club, the cheeky restaurant space in the Virgin Hotel, with its peekaboo-themed shag room and art-filled setting for conversation and noshing. The menu, which includes gluten-free and vegetarian options, ranges from spaghetti with lamb meatballs to roast chicken and barbecue shrimp.

Devil Moon Barbecue

When only smoked meat will do, Devil Moon can oblige. Start with cracklins and move into slabs of spare ribs and platters piled high with brisket, with red beans, and greens, and Frito pie on the side. Devil Moon offers plenty of house-made brews for pairing.

Seaworthy

Seaworthy, an Ace Hotel restaurant in a sweet Creole cottage on Carondolet Street, offers sustainably harvested oysters, local fish and game, and creative cocktails, a fine trifecta for Mardi Gras Day. With a dining room that might as well be carved from the prow of a wooden ship, Seaworthy is an intimate port in the Carnival storm.

Cooter Brown's Tavern

For parade-goers staying Uptown, Cooter Brown’s is a sports bar with darn good eats. The limited Mardi Gras menu precludes the usual raw oysters, instead putting the emphasis on fried seafood, burgers, po’boys, and local comfort fare, including red beans and jambalaya. There’s a veggie burger and cheese fries for the meat-averse.

Avenue Pub

Mardi Gras central since it opened in 1987, Avenue Pub is now owned by the guys behind Blue Oak Barbecue, who know better than to mess with tradition. There’s a $10 wrist band for the bathroom and a menu that ranges from fish tacos and fried shrimp to boudin balls and loaded tots. On the drink side, besides 40 beers on tap, there will be frozen Irish coffee and jello shots to keep the party going.

Bayou Bar

There are so many reasons to love Bayou Bar in the Pontchartrain Hotel, from the intimate pub’s outstanding live jazz to its menu of excellent American eats, including a fine burger, satisfying red beans, dirty rice and fried catfish on a bun. Bayou Bar will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mardi Gras day. The hotel’s coffee shop,  Silver Whistle, will be serving coffee and breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

Ground zero for parades, Superior Seafood is mobbed even on an average Tuesday. Expect droves of seafood eaters, many who reserve tables far in advance, dining within gawking distance of the action. The restaurant is known for fresh oysters and seafood, which feature in dishes like shrimp and grits and crab bisque.

Related Maps

Good Catch Thai Urban Bistro

Good Catch Nola is the latest from chef Aom Srisuk, who opened Pomelo Uptown with her husband Frankie Weinberg in late 2021. The larger restaurant in the CBD will be open for parade goers craving dishes like flavorful pad Thai with shrimp and scallops and seafood tom yum ramen. Unlike Pomelo, there’s a full bar.

Mother's

Mother’s Restaurant, smack dab on the end of the parade route for many krewes, will be dishing strong drinks and huge portions of New Orleans comfort food from 7 am to 10 pm Mardi Gras Day. The debris po’boy is one specialty, or order the meaty bits piled on a plate of eggs. Nothing fancy to see here, but lots of options to banish the hangries.

Fritai

Chef Charly Pierre is opening his winning Haitian restaurant Fritai, situated right in the heart of the Zulu festivities, from 8 am to 5 pm on Mardi Gras Day. For sure to try the addictive fried wings, marinated in epis, his country’s national spice blend bright with garlic, green herbs, peppers and vinegar. Add the Creole hot sauce for extra kick. If the crab mac and cheese is on the limited menu, don’t miss it.

Related Maps