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Shrimp spring roll from 9 Roses
Nine Roses Restaurant

New Orleans’s Essential Vietnamese Restaurants

From New Orleans East to the West Bank, there is no shortage of excellent Vietnamese cuisine in New Orleans

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Shrimp spring roll from 9 Roses
| Nine Roses Restaurant

Thanks to the Vietnamese community that has made New Orleans home since the mid 1970s, the city has a thriving restaurant scene, one that’s gotten bigger and better in the last decade. It used to be seekers of the cuisine had to go to New Orleans East or the West Bank to sample lemon-grassed scented bao and pho fragrant with star anise and cardamom. Now mom and pop shops are everywhere, from Uptown to Mid City to the French Quarter. Lovers of this clean herb-fueled cuisine couldn’t be happier.

Here are Eater’s picks for New Orleans’s 16 essential Vietnamese restaurants, arranged geographically.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Banh Mi Boys (Multiple Locations)

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Although it looks like part of a gas station (actually it’s just next door), Banh Mi Boys on Airline Highway is worth the drive — and now there’s a second location right on Magazine Street. The menu ranges from straight up Vietnamese specials like spring rolls, vermicelli plates and banh mi to a mash up of Cajun, Korean and local flavors — try the bulgogi beef banh mi, the Asian wings and the darn good soft shell crab po-boy. Owner Peter Nguyen cares and it shows.

A banh mi filled with charred beef, carrots, white onions, and cilantro sits on a wood slab.
Pho Spice Beef Rib Banh Mi from Banh Mi Boys
Banh Mi Boys/Official Photo

Singleton's Mini Mart

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Singleton’s is a typical corner store, family run, located a few minutes from Tulane and Loyola. The family happens to be Vietnamese, which means the fried egg rolls are homemade, the pho (only offered Saturdays) is super, and the banh mi po-boys rock. The “usual” po-boys are also good, from fried oysters to roast beef.

Ba Chi Canteen

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The menu at this Maple street gem is a kick: bacos (bao meets taco), gyoza nachos, kimchi fries, green tea Kit-Kat cheesecake — the mash-ups never stop. Insanely good, cheap, and friendly, Ba Hi Canteen is a winner.

A white dish containing dumplings topped with chilis, soy sauce, and cilantro
A special Ba Chi Canteen calls the “steamed beggar’s purse” with chili soy
Ba Chi Canteen/Facebook

Rolls-N-Bowls

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Consider heading to this Old Metairie cafe for happy hour, when spring rolls are half off and they are spot-on good. Located on a busy section of Metairie Road, Rolls-N-Bowls specializes in two things: spring rolls of all flavors and steaming bowls of pho on the quick and cheap. The tasty bowls are crammed with vegetables, nice and fresh. Bubble tea is here, one of few spots in town.

Rolls-N-Bowls
Yelp/Bob B.

Mint Modern Vietnamese

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Mint Modern Vietnamese doesn’t follow any rules when it comes to Vietnamese food. There’s a banh mi burger (which also happens to be one of the city’s greatest burgers) and banh mi stuffed with everything from fried soft shell crab to french fries and mushrooms. A meat lover’s option combines barbecue pork, pate, Vietnamese ham and meatballs. This contemporary spot has a full bar, table service, and a playful menu.

A bright green sign hangs outside a restaurant reading “Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar”
Mint Modern
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Le's Baguette Banh Mi Cafe

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Serving breakfast from 11 a.m. every day but Tuesday, Le’s is yet another family-owned Viet cafe that exceeds expectations. Fans appreciate spring rolls, steamed buns filled with lemongrass chicken, banh mi sandwiches, and steaming pho. Worth noting: Le’s Baguette gets its bread from Dong Phuong bakery in New Orleans East.

A steamed bun filled with fried oysters, coleslaw, and aioli
Fried oyster steamed buns
Le’s Baguette Banh Mi Cafe/Facebook

Magasin Vietnamese Cafe

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New Orleans native Kim Nguyen’s Magazine hot spot helped kicked off a contemporary Vietnamese boom in 2012. Magasin has a sleek, comfortable interior and serves polished pho at affordable prices, at the second location in the Warehouse District, Magasin Kitchen, (611 O’Keefe Avenue) as well.

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Pho Tau Bay Restaurant

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Pho Tau Bay is a family affair, with roots that reach back to Saigon in the 60s, when the family patriarch owned restaurants there. Spiced beef stew is a specialty here, served over rice noodles or warm French bread, but all the usual suspects are represented on the menu. Lots of good vegetarian dishes, a bonus.

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Pho Noi Viet

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Simply delicious Vietnamese food is the standard at Pho Noi Viet on Magazine. There’s a vegan pho option, but the rare beef brisket is tough to miss. Lemongrass chicken, shaken beef, and plump banh mi sandwiches all served in no time at all, with a smile.

The yellow interior of a restaurant with a left wall lined with two-top tables and a right wall lined with four-top tables.
The interior of Pho Noi Viet
Pho Noi Viet/Official Photo

Lilly's Café

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This sweet and cozy Vietnamese cafe in the Lower Garden District has been a longtime lunch favorite, with quick and friendly service. The rich pho broth simmered for eight hours puts it at the top of the city’s crowded pho list.

Thanh Thanh

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Situated in the heart of Old Gretna steps from the river, Thanh Thanh serves something to please every palate. Avocado toast? Yep. Omelets, sure. Buttermilk fried chicken with truffle fries — uh, sure. But the Vietnamese fare is the real deal, from the crispy filled crepes to the banh mi.

Pho from Thanh Thanh
Thanh Thanh/Facebook

Tan Dinh

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The menu at Tan Dinh is vast, just one reason this Gretna eatery is such a hot spot. Try the rice paper-wrapped or fried spring rolls filled with shrimp or pork, anything with lemongrass tofu, flavored rice bowls, and tangy vegetable-forward vermicelli bowls. There’s also Korean style barbecued ribs served with kimchi and a nice line up Vietnamese beer.

A white bowl holds rice noodles topped with shrimp, greens, crumbled peanuts and cilantro
Shrimp vermicelli bowl from Tan Dinh
Tan Dinh/Official

9 Roses Restaurant

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The huge and newly renovated original restaurant on the West Bank delivers awesome Vietnamese specialties and Chinese food alike, but it’s the crispy spring rolls, vermicelli bowls, and lemongrass tofu that bring us in. There’s a solid vegan menu, too.

Ba Mien Restaurant

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One of the go-tos in New Orleans East, Ba Mien is a typical strip mall joint with a menu that delivers traditional Vietnamese flavors and lots of options. There’s tripe in some pho — which isn’t always offered — and banh cuon, or steamed rice flour rolls (think feather-light Vietnamese manicotti), stuffed with grilled pork, a Saigon specialty.

Ba Mien Restaurant on Chef Menteur Hwy
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Dong Phuong

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Dong Phuong won a James Beard America’s Classics Award in 2018, and deservedly so. Revered for its fresh bread delivered to restaurants all over the city and its King Cakes during Carnival season, Dong Phuong was one of the first to offer banh mi sandwiches when it opened in 1982. Still drawing crowds in the morning and at lunch, the restaurant and bakery deserves a visit.

A red brick standalone restaurant with a beige roof with a parking lot in front
Dong Phuong Bakery
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Phở NOLA

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For a strip small, Pho NOLA’s space on Transcontinental Drive is spacious, light, and airy, with a nice L-shaped bar for post-work dining. It’s a favorite for its vast menu of boba and special teas as much as for banh mi, pho, and other noodle soups,

Phở Bang Restaurant

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Along the same highway as Ba Mien in New Orleans is the quiet Pho Bang, flying under the radar but not to be overlooked. Try the cold bun salad and ultra meaty house pho featuring tripe, flank, brisket, ‘navel’ and tendon.

Bill Addison/Eater

Banh Mi Boys (Multiple Locations)

A banh mi filled with charred beef, carrots, white onions, and cilantro sits on a wood slab.
Pho Spice Beef Rib Banh Mi from Banh Mi Boys
Banh Mi Boys/Official Photo

Although it looks like part of a gas station (actually it’s just next door), Banh Mi Boys on Airline Highway is worth the drive — and now there’s a second location right on Magazine Street. The menu ranges from straight up Vietnamese specials like spring rolls, vermicelli plates and banh mi to a mash up of Cajun, Korean and local flavors — try the bulgogi beef banh mi, the Asian wings and the darn good soft shell crab po-boy. Owner Peter Nguyen cares and it shows.

A banh mi filled with charred beef, carrots, white onions, and cilantro sits on a wood slab.
Pho Spice Beef Rib Banh Mi from Banh Mi Boys
Banh Mi Boys/Official Photo

Singleton's Mini Mart

Singleton’s is a typical corner store, family run, located a few minutes from Tulane and Loyola. The family happens to be Vietnamese, which means the fried egg rolls are homemade, the pho (only offered Saturdays) is super, and the banh mi po-boys rock. The “usual” po-boys are also good, from fried oysters to roast beef.

Ba Chi Canteen

A white dish containing dumplings topped with chilis, soy sauce, and cilantro
A special Ba Chi Canteen calls the “steamed beggar’s purse” with chili soy
Ba Chi Canteen/Facebook

The menu at this Maple street gem is a kick: bacos (bao meets taco), gyoza nachos, kimchi fries, green tea Kit-Kat cheesecake — the mash-ups never stop. Insanely good, cheap, and friendly, Ba Hi Canteen is a winner.

A white dish containing dumplings topped with chilis, soy sauce, and cilantro
A special Ba Chi Canteen calls the “steamed beggar’s purse” with chili soy
Ba Chi Canteen/Facebook

Rolls-N-Bowls

Rolls-N-Bowls
Yelp/Bob B.

Consider heading to this Old Metairie cafe for happy hour, when spring rolls are half off and they are spot-on good. Located on a busy section of Metairie Road, Rolls-N-Bowls specializes in two things: spring rolls of all flavors and steaming bowls of pho on the quick and cheap. The tasty bowls are crammed with vegetables, nice and fresh. Bubble tea is here, one of few spots in town.

Rolls-N-Bowls
Yelp/Bob B.

Mint Modern Vietnamese

A bright green sign hangs outside a restaurant reading “Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar”
Mint Modern
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Mint Modern Vietnamese doesn’t follow any rules when it comes to Vietnamese food. There’s a banh mi burger (which also happens to be one of the city’s greatest burgers) and banh mi stuffed with everything from fried soft shell crab to french fries and mushrooms. A meat lover’s option combines barbecue pork, pate, Vietnamese ham and meatballs. This contemporary spot has a full bar, table service, and a playful menu.

A bright green sign hangs outside a restaurant reading “Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar”
Mint Modern
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Le's Baguette Banh Mi Cafe

A steamed bun filled with fried oysters, coleslaw, and aioli
Fried oyster steamed buns
Le’s Baguette Banh Mi Cafe/Facebook

Serving breakfast from 11 a.m. every day but Tuesday, Le’s is yet another family-owned Viet cafe that exceeds expectations. Fans appreciate spring rolls, steamed buns filled with lemongrass chicken, banh mi sandwiches, and steaming pho. Worth noting: Le’s Baguette gets its bread from Dong Phuong bakery in New Orleans East.

A steamed bun filled with fried oysters, coleslaw, and aioli
Fried oyster steamed buns
Le’s Baguette Banh Mi Cafe/Facebook

Magasin Vietnamese Cafe

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

New Orleans native Kim Nguyen’s Magazine hot spot helped kicked off a contemporary Vietnamese boom in 2012. Magasin has a sleek, comfortable interior and serves polished pho at affordable prices, at the second location in the Warehouse District, Magasin Kitchen, (611 O’Keefe Avenue) as well.

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Pho Tau Bay Restaurant

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Pho Tau Bay is a family affair, with roots that reach back to Saigon in the 60s, when the family patriarch owned restaurants there. Spiced beef stew is a specialty here, served over rice noodles or warm French bread, but all the usual suspects are represented on the menu. Lots of good vegetarian dishes, a bonus.

Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

Pho Noi Viet

The yellow interior of a restaurant with a left wall lined with two-top tables and a right wall lined with four-top tables.
The interior of Pho Noi Viet
Pho Noi Viet/Official Photo

Simply delicious Vietnamese food is the standard at Pho Noi Viet on Magazine. There’s a vegan pho option, but the rare beef brisket is tough to miss. Lemongrass chicken, shaken beef, and plump banh mi sandwiches all served in no time at all, with a smile.

The yellow interior of a restaurant with a left wall lined with two-top tables and a right wall lined with four-top tables.
The interior of Pho Noi Viet
Pho Noi Viet/Official Photo

Lilly's Café

This sweet and cozy Vietnamese cafe in the Lower Garden District has been a longtime lunch favorite, with quick and friendly service. The rich pho broth simmered for eight hours puts it at the top of the city’s crowded pho list.

Thanh Thanh

Pho from Thanh Thanh
Thanh Thanh/Facebook

Situated in the heart of Old Gretna steps from the river, Thanh Thanh serves something to please every palate. Avocado toast? Yep. Omelets, sure. Buttermilk fried chicken with truffle fries — uh, sure. But the Vietnamese fare is the real deal, from the crispy filled crepes to the banh mi.

Pho from Thanh Thanh
Thanh Thanh/Facebook

Tan Dinh

A white bowl holds rice noodles topped with shrimp, greens, crumbled peanuts and cilantro
Shrimp vermicelli bowl from Tan Dinh
Tan Dinh/Official

The menu at Tan Dinh is vast, just one reason this Gretna eatery is such a hot spot. Try the rice paper-wrapped or fried spring rolls filled with shrimp or pork, anything with lemongrass tofu, flavored rice bowls, and tangy vegetable-forward vermicelli bowls. There’s also Korean style barbecued ribs served with kimchi and a nice line up Vietnamese beer.

A white bowl holds rice noodles topped with shrimp, greens, crumbled peanuts and cilantro
Shrimp vermicelli bowl from Tan Dinh
Tan Dinh/Official

9 Roses Restaurant

The huge and newly renovated original restaurant on the West Bank delivers awesome Vietnamese specialties and Chinese food alike, but it’s the crispy spring rolls, vermicelli bowls, and lemongrass tofu that bring us in. There’s a solid vegan menu, too.

Ba Mien Restaurant

Ba Mien Restaurant on Chef Menteur Hwy
Josh Brasted/Eater NOLA

One of the go-tos in New Orleans East, Ba Mien is a typical strip mall joint with a menu that delivers traditional Vietnamese flavors and lots of options. There’s tripe in some pho — which isn’t always offered — and banh cuon, or steamed rice flour rolls (think feather-light Vietnamese manicotti), stuffed with grilled pork, a Saigon specialty.