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A traditional brass jazz band plays the local party music on a street corner on March 17, 2022 in the Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana..
Frenchmen Street in Faubourg Marigny.
Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Where to Eat in Faubourg Marigny

St. Claude Avenue bars, Frenchmen Street clubs, and eclectic restaurants make up this neighborhood stretching from Esplanade Avenue to Homer Plessy Way

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Frenchmen Street in Faubourg Marigny.
| Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Faubourg Marigny, on the downriver border of the French Quarter, is an original Creole neighborhood named for 19th-century aristocrat Bernard de Marigny de Mandeville. In 1800, when his father died, Marigny became the richest 15-year-old in America, inheriting a vast fortune and the plantation which once defined the neighborhood.

In typical Big Easy style, Marigny lost the family homestead to gambling (he’s credited with creating the game of craps), but his loss was the city’s gain because the Marigny, with its Creole cottages, Frenchmen Street music clubs, St. Claude Avenue bars, and eclectic restaurants, is a neighborhood not be missed.

A bountiful breakfast and brunch destination, this neighborhood also offers Creole Italian and New York bagels; Thai, Mediterranean, and Southern American cuisine — here is a sampling of the best bars, restaurants, and live music spots to check out from Esplanade to Homer Plessy.

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Budsi’s Authentic Thai

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Budsi’s Authentic Thai started as a pop-up kitchen, most frequently found outside Pal’s in Mid City. The couple that runs it opened their restaurant of the same name a few years back, with chef Budsaba Mason serving a menu of familiar Thai food like drunken noodles and pad thai as well as Issan specialties like waterfall pork, beef and chicken larb, fermented fish, crab som tam, and mango sticky rice. This corner Marigny spot is always jumping, and you order from the counter, so be prepared to wait a few minutes.

Nonno’s Cajun Cuisine and Pastries

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Chef Shermond Esteen Jr.’s delightful homestyle restaurant has a Marigny home in the former location of longtime breakfast haunt Horn’s. The all-day menu starts with breakfast, serving fluffy French toast, shrimp and grits, breakfast burritos and more; for lunch it’s po’ boys and a file gumbo which might include jumbo shrimp or crabmeat, sausage, and chicken; and for dinner, catfish, shrimp, and red snapper plates rule. Open seven days a week with inside, outdoor seating, and takeout available.

Three Muses

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Three Muses was closed for more than a year, and fans missed the menu of Asian inspired tapas as much as the intimate venue’s swell music offerings. Although it’s slightly abbreviated, there’s still Ms. Moon’s bulgogi rice bowl with house-made kimchi, and a host of vegetarian options at this Frenchman Street standard. Book a table in advance to be assured of a seat. Mix in live music by acts like Gal Holiday and Bart Ramsey a you’ve got the perfect place to eat, drink, and catch some live music.

Ayu Bakehouse

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Ayu is one of the best new bakeries in New Orleans, a bright, quaint corner shop with a mellow vibe. From savory pastries like a muffuletta breadstick and a shroom broom; to seeded sourdough and crusty baguettes; to sweets like a kaya bun, croissant, and chocolate chip cookie, everything is excellent. Sandwiches rotate and include a seasonal vegetarian option, and during Carnival season, the bakery serves one of the best new king cakes in town.

Ayu’s croissant king cake.
Clair Lorell/Eater NOLA

Adolfo's

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Despite the passing of chef Adolfo Perez Palavacini last August, his family is keeping his legacy alive at Adolfo’s, situated above the Apple Barrel, a no-frills joint that draws legions of loyal regulars. This cramped and lively spot delivers Creole Italian cuisine, which is its own thing in New Orleans, with huge portions, rich seafood sauces (usually including or topped with cheese), and house specialties including crabmeat and corn cannelloni. For dessert, try the rum espresso-soaked tiramisu.

New Orleans Art Bar

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Head to the back courtyard or hang in one of the pretty rooms at the classy New Orleans Art Bar, where an extensive list of cocktails — there are individual menus each for vodka, gin, whiskey and bourbon, cognac, tequila, and rum drinks — and tasty bar bites are served in a lively, highbrow setting. There’s even bottle service, and craft cocktails are half-off from 5 to 7 p.m.

Nola Mia Gelato Cafe

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This family-owned cafe on St. Claude Avenue opened a few years back, bringing an array of homemade gelato, Italian ice, paninis, pizza, and NY bagels to the neighborhood. Nola Mia is a great spot to grab an affordable sandwich and get an Italian treat to take home. The two-slice special for $5 is a steal — plain or pepperoni.

Paladar 511

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This inventive California Italian neighborhood spot puts forward a menu of fresh pasta and thin-crust pizza, creative small plates, and a handful of top-notch entrees. Set in a soaring, exposed bricks and beams former warehouse space — which means it’s loud when tables are full — Paladar 511 is consistently excellent. The squid ink spaghetti is highly recommended, and the same goes for the homemade pappardelle with spicy sausage ragu and ribbons of basil. Don’t miss the Sicilian arancini, the fried baseball-sized risotto balls oozing short rib ragu brightened with lemon.

The Elysian Bar

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This gem inside Hotel Peter and Paul comes from the people behind wine favorite Bacchanal. The Elysian Bar’s Mediterranean-rooted menu is fetching indeed, with the likes of crab and ricotta gnocchi with Calabrian chile peppers; crispy pork belly with purple cabbage pureé, hazelnut, and charred cabbage; and roasted beef bone marrow with cashew, pickled chioggia beet, and mint. Have a drink in the rectory bar with its Gothic vibe and dine inside or in the lovely courtyard. Walk-ins are welcome but reservations are suggested.

Who Dat Coffee Cafe

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Down the block from Hotel Peter and Paul, Who Dat is a fine locals joint for breakfast and lunch. Along with a friendly atmosphere and funky interior, eggs are perfectly cooked, and omelets sport names like Da Mandeville and Da Cajun. Chicken fried steak is always an option and sandwiches come with a side salad and fries. Get the burger, a Reuben, or Da Marigny (shrimp and crabmeat tossed in a crystal-laced sauce and dished into a toasted ciabatta roll with salad on the side). Weekend specials are always great.

Marie's Bar and Kitchen

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This longtime divey corner bar is home to one of the best burgers in town, Chad Barlow’s slap burgers. He blends a quarter-pound of 80/20 ground beef with three secret ingredients, (one is butter), always juicy despite being cooked to medium well. Barlow dresses them with his secret sauce modeled after In-N-Out Burger’s, crispy Vlasic dills, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, and yellow American cheese, all on a toasted brioche bun.

Anna’s continues the funky, neighborhood-centric vibe initiated by its predecessor Mimi’s, with pool sharks hanging around the table and chill bar downstairs, and a packed upstairs that offers some of the best pop-ups and cocktails in the city. Go for Tacos Para la Vida or Wood Duck, stay for the great wine list and friendly bartenders who are always game to shake up a great mocktail.

Breakaway's Restaurant & Bar

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At this no-frills neighborhood joint, Paul and Olivia Artigues are serving New Orleans staples like gumbo, a beef daube sandwich, crawfish etouffee, fried shrimp, and white beans with ham hock — as well as a number of vegan versions of New Orleans classics. The small menu of sno-ball cocktails is especially fun: the Green Goblin, made with absinthe, orange liqueur, and lime over shaved ice; the Pretty Baby with nectar cream and vodka; a mint julep; and a sno-ball version of Cafe Brulot, a cocktail normally made by lighting cognac on fire. Blessedly, Breakaway’s serves food until late.

Morrow's

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Ever since Larry Morrow and his mother, Lenora Chong opened the doors to Morrow’s, it’s been a packed hotspot. With a menu of New Orleans classics like gumbo, sautéed crab claws, jambalaya, and chargrilled oysters along with some Korean dishes like bibimbap and lettuce wraps, the menu satisfies as much as the chic space. The restaurant invites with beautiful cypress wood banquettes, great local art, and a green grassy wall behind the bar.

The Franklin

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The Marigny’s chic corner bistro The Franklin offers a romantic and intimate atmosphere, reliable bar program, and a hearty but elegant Italian-inspired menu. The menu’s highlights include the steamed mussels, fried frog legs, braised rabbit pasta, and the house specialty, a hefty chicken parmesan. There’s a super happy hour from 5 to 7 p.m. daily.

Small Mart

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This busy breakfast, lunch, and coffee spot on the edge of the Marigny combines the owner’s love of Indian and vegetarian food and New York bagels — he imports them from a top-secret location. Small Mart offers a global curry bowl fueled by the chef’s own spice blends and plenty of vegetables, an excellent Bombay sandwich stuffed with tofu, tomato, avocado, spinach, mint chutney, and vegan aioli, and samosas you’ll want to eat again and again. Baked off NYC bagels are topped with smoked salmon (the only non-vegetarian item on the menu), a variety of schmear, and ingredients like pickles jalapeno, veggie hummus, and avocado are famous here.

Artisan Bar and Cafe

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Artisan Bar on St. Claude Avenue is a Cheers-style neighborhood joint with a friendly crowd and good Southern bar food. Pimiento cheese, deviled eggs, and thick-cut pork chop served with  skillet maque choux are a few satisfying options, but check out the daily specials, like New Orleans barbecue shrimp on Mondays and a fried catfish and shrimp platter on Fridays. Brunch is served Saturday and Sunday beginning at 11 a.m.; otherwise it opens at 1 p.m.

Budsi’s Authentic Thai

Budsi’s Authentic Thai started as a pop-up kitchen, most frequently found outside Pal’s in Mid City. The couple that runs it opened their restaurant of the same name a few years back, with chef Budsaba Mason serving a menu of familiar Thai food like drunken noodles and pad thai as well as Issan specialties like waterfall pork, beef and chicken larb, fermented fish, crab som tam, and mango sticky rice. This corner Marigny spot is always jumping, and you order from the counter, so be prepared to wait a few minutes.

Nonno’s Cajun Cuisine and Pastries

Chef Shermond Esteen Jr.’s delightful homestyle restaurant has a Marigny home in the former location of longtime breakfast haunt Horn’s. The all-day menu starts with breakfast, serving fluffy French toast, shrimp and grits, breakfast burritos and more; for lunch it’s po’ boys and a file gumbo which might include jumbo shrimp or crabmeat, sausage, and chicken; and for dinner, catfish, shrimp, and red snapper plates rule. Open seven days a week with inside, outdoor seating, and takeout available.

Three Muses

Three Muses was closed for more than a year, and fans missed the menu of Asian inspired tapas as much as the intimate venue’s swell music offerings. Although it’s slightly abbreviated, there’s still Ms. Moon’s bulgogi rice bowl with house-made kimchi, and a host of vegetarian options at this Frenchman Street standard. Book a table in advance to be assured of a seat. Mix in live music by acts like Gal Holiday and Bart Ramsey a you’ve got the perfect place to eat, drink, and catch some live music.

Ayu Bakehouse

Ayu is one of the best new bakeries in New Orleans, a bright, quaint corner shop with a mellow vibe. From savory pastries like a muffuletta breadstick and a shroom broom; to seeded sourdough and crusty baguettes; to sweets like a kaya bun, croissant, and chocolate chip cookie, everything is excellent. Sandwiches rotate and include a seasonal vegetarian option, and during Carnival season, the bakery serves one of the best new king cakes in town.

Ayu’s croissant king cake.
Clair Lorell/Eater NOLA

Adolfo's

Despite the passing of chef Adolfo Perez Palavacini last August, his family is keeping his legacy alive at Adolfo’s, situated above the Apple Barrel, a no-frills joint that draws legions of loyal regulars. This cramped and lively spot delivers Creole Italian cuisine, which is its own thing in New Orleans, with huge portions, rich seafood sauces (usually including or topped with cheese), and house specialties including crabmeat and corn cannelloni. For dessert, try the rum espresso-soaked tiramisu.

New Orleans Art Bar

Head to the back courtyard or hang in one of the pretty rooms at the classy New Orleans Art Bar, where an extensive list of cocktails — there are individual menus each for vodka, gin, whiskey and bourbon, cognac, tequila, and rum drinks — and tasty bar bites are served in a lively, highbrow setting. There’s even bottle service, and craft cocktails are half-off from 5 to 7 p.m.

Nola Mia Gelato Cafe

This family-owned cafe on St. Claude Avenue opened a few years back, bringing an array of homemade gelato, Italian ice, paninis, pizza, and NY bagels to the neighborhood. Nola Mia is a great spot to grab an affordable sandwich and get an Italian treat to take home. The two-slice special for $5 is a steal — plain or pepperoni.

Paladar 511

This inventive California Italian neighborhood spot puts forward a menu of fresh pasta and thin-crust pizza, creative small plates, and a handful of top-notch entrees. Set in a soaring, exposed bricks and beams former warehouse space — which means it’s loud when tables are full — Paladar 511 is consistently excellent. The squid ink spaghetti is highly recommended, and the same goes for the homemade pappardelle with spicy sausage ragu and ribbons of basil. Don’t miss the Sicilian arancini, the fried baseball-sized risotto balls oozing short rib ragu brightened with lemon.

The Elysian Bar

This gem inside Hotel Peter and Paul comes from the people behind wine favorite Bacchanal. The Elysian Bar’s Mediterranean-rooted menu is fetching indeed, with the likes of crab and ricotta gnocchi with Calabrian chile peppers; crispy pork belly with purple cabbage pureé, hazelnut, and charred cabbage; and roasted beef bone marrow with cashew, pickled chioggia beet, and mint. Have a drink in the rectory bar with its Gothic vibe and dine inside or in the lovely courtyard. Walk-ins are welcome but reservations are suggested.

Who Dat Coffee Cafe

Down the block from Hotel Peter and Paul, Who Dat is a fine locals joint for breakfast and lunch. Along with a friendly atmosphere and funky interior, eggs are perfectly cooked, and omelets sport names like Da Mandeville and Da Cajun. Chicken fried steak is always an option and sandwiches come with a side salad and fries. Get the burger, a Reuben, or Da Marigny (shrimp and crabmeat tossed in a crystal-laced sauce and dished into a toasted ciabatta roll with salad on the side). Weekend specials are always great.

Marie's Bar and Kitchen

This longtime divey corner bar is home to one of the best burgers in town, Chad Barlow’s slap burgers. He blends a quarter-pound of 80/20 ground beef with three secret ingredients, (one is butter), always juicy despite being cooked to medium well. Barlow dresses them with his secret sauce modeled after In-N-Out Burger’s, crispy Vlasic dills, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, and yellow American cheese, all on a toasted brioche bun.

Anna's

Anna’s continues the funky, neighborhood-centric vibe initiated by its predecessor Mimi’s, with pool sharks hanging around the table and chill bar downstairs, and a packed upstairs that offers some of the best pop-ups and cocktails in the city. Go for Tacos Para la Vida or Wood Duck, stay for the great wine list and friendly bartenders who are always game to shake up a great mocktail.

Breakaway's Restaurant & Bar

At this no-frills neighborhood joint, Paul and Olivia Artigues are serving New Orleans staples like gumbo, a beef daube sandwich, crawfish etouffee, fried shrimp, and white beans with ham hock — as well as a number of vegan versions of New Orleans classics. The small menu of sno-ball cocktails is especially fun: the Green Goblin, made with absinthe, orange liqueur, and lime over shaved ice; the Pretty Baby with nectar cream and vodka; a mint julep; and a sno-ball version of Cafe Brulot, a cocktail normally made by lighting cognac on fire. Blessedly, Breakaway’s serves food until late.

Morrow's

Ever since Larry Morrow and his mother, Lenora Chong opened the doors to Morrow’s, it’s been a packed hotspot. With a menu of New Orleans classics like gumbo, sautéed crab claws, jambalaya, and chargrilled oysters along with some Korean dishes like bibimbap and lettuce wraps, the menu satisfies as much as the chic space. The restaurant invites with beautiful cypress wood banquettes, great local art, and a green grassy wall behind the bar.

The Franklin

The Marigny’s chic corner bistro The Franklin offers a romantic and intimate atmosphere, reliable bar program, and a hearty but elegant Italian-inspired menu. The menu’s highlights include the steamed mussels, fried frog legs, braised rabbit pasta, and the house specialty, a hefty chicken parmesan. There’s a super happy hour from 5 to 7 p.m. daily.

Related Maps

Small Mart

This busy breakfast, lunch, and coffee spot on the edge of the Marigny combines the owner’s love of Indian and vegetarian food and New York bagels — he imports them from a top-secret location. Small Mart offers a global curry bowl fueled by the chef’s own spice blends and plenty of vegetables, an excellent Bombay sandwich stuffed with tofu, tomato, avocado, spinach, mint chutney, and vegan aioli, and samosas you’ll want to eat again and again. Baked off NYC bagels are topped with smoked salmon (the only non-vegetarian item on the menu), a variety of schmear, and ingredients like pickles jalapeno, veggie hummus, and avocado are famous here.

Artisan Bar and Cafe

Artisan Bar on St. Claude Avenue is a Cheers-style neighborhood joint with a friendly crowd and good Southern bar food. Pimiento cheese, deviled eggs, and thick-cut pork chop served with  skillet maque choux are a few satisfying options, but check out the daily specials, like New Orleans barbecue shrimp on Mondays and a fried catfish and shrimp platter on Fridays. Brunch is served Saturday and Sunday beginning at 11 a.m.; otherwise it opens at 1 p.m.

Related Maps