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Antoine’s Mystery Room
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The Best Private Dining Rooms in New Orleans

When dining with the masses just won’t do

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Antoine’s Mystery Room
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New Orleans is the seat of decadence and hospitality, but even with all that, sometimes it’s necessary to kick it up another notch. Enter the world of private dining in New Orleans, complete with notable amenities like Bourbon Street balconies, special access to world-class wine cellars, menus designed especially for the occasion, and vintage Mardi Gras memorabilia.

It’s for when you need to do it up — big time. Of course, New Orleans has plenty of private dining to choose from. Here’s a map of 8 restaurants with strikingly special private dining options.

To be clear, these are not reception venues for large gatherings, but restaurants that have dining available for parties as small as 15. If you need something with more space, check out Eater’s map of top reception spaces. This list is not organized by ranking. Have another favorite go-to? Share in the comments below.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Ralph's On The Park

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Ralph’s on the Park, situated in oak-tree rich Mid City, features several private dining rooms on the second floor of the restaurant, with seating from 10 to 200. The private dining areas include incredible, wrought-iron balconies overlooking City Park, perfect for pre-dinner cocktails and hors d’oeuvres.

The private dining rooms at Ralph’s on the Park include balconies overlooking City Park.
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Antoine's Restaurant

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The Mystery Room at Antoine’s earned its name during Prohibition when the 18th Amendment prohibited the sale of alcohol, an experiment that New Orleans never took very seriously. At Antoine’s, guests in the know could venture through a door in the ladies’ room to a secret room and exit with a coffee cup full of booze. When someone asked the lucky imbiber where they got it, the response was, “It’s a mystery to me.” Just like that, the Mystery Room got its name. Now reserved for private dining, the space seats 20-50 people and is decorated with souvenirs from famous restaurants around the world and quirky items like Groucho Marx’s beret. Plenty of other dining rooms are available for both smaller and larger parties, so be sure to check the full list of offerings on the website.

The Mystery Room at Antoine’s got its name during Prohibition.
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Brennan's

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The Wine Room at Brennan’s lies beyond the courtyard, in a building that was once a stable at the big pink Brennan’s building that was built on 1795. It then became the restaurant’s wine cellar — dark, exclusive, and separate from the main building. Until Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group took over the restaurant and unleashed a massive renovation that put the iconic spot back on the map, diners never got near the cellar. Now it houses wines plus a private dining space for up to 16 people. In terms of decor, think leather chairs, brick walls, and a cypress table amidst bottles and bottles of wine.

Private dining at Brennan’s includes the option to use the wine cellar, which is housed behind the restaurant.
Brennan’s

The Bourbon Suites at Arnaud's

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Arnaud’s is home to a dizzying maze of private dining rooms, each with its own personality — and probably its own ghosts. The quintessential New Orleans experience can be found in the Bourbon Suites, which come with a lobby; private, built-in bar; and a balcony overlooking Bourbon for all the bead-throwing needs. Each adjoining suite seats 20 people. One of the most festive times to visit is when the restaurant gets decked out for the holidays. Be sure to visit the restaurant’s own private Mardi Gras Museum, and grab a drink at the award-winning French 75 Bar. Plus, 2018 marks this restaurant’s 100th year, which is a reason in itself to celebrate in style.

Arnaud’s Bourbon Suites
Arnaud’s

Salon Restaurant

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The holidays conjure images of all things sugar plum fairies — and there’s hardly a place better than Salon by Sucre to indulge in all things sugar. The restaurant, located in the French Quarter, is an outpost of the popular macaroon and sweets shop that started on Magazine Street. The private dining room has space for 25 seated and 30 in a reception format. Complete the look with a macaroon tree centerpiece.

The private dining room at Salon by Sucre.
Salon by Sucre

The Third Floor at Seaworthy

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The first floor with its large, marble oyster bar, and the second floor with a smaller cocktail bar are familiar territory to Seaworthy guests. Follow those curved staircases up past more candles held firm with dripped wax to the third floor, which houses the restaurant’s private dining room. It’s an intimate room fit for a ship’s captain with seating for 20.

The exterior of Seaworthy.
Alyssa Beers

The Mezzanine at Cochon

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There’s dining, and then there’s Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski dining, which can involve lots of meat and southern sides at Cochon. Why not tuck your napkin in your shirt and put your elbows on the table out of view of others, or sort of out of view of others? The new semi-private mezzanine in the Diamond Street dining room at Cochon seats up to 40.

Mezzanine at Cochon
Cochon

The Wine Cellar at Commander's Palace

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The private dining room at Commander’s Palace is as exclusive as it gets. Walk past the masses through an iron gate and down a hallway to the restaurant’s famous wine cellar, which has a table set up for dining. Expect a menu designed for the occasion for 10-14 guests, plus wine pairings. Word to the wise: Bring a sweater; wine cellars are cold.

Commander’s Palace

Ralph's On The Park

The private dining rooms at Ralph’s on the Park include balconies overlooking City Park.
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Ralph’s on the Park, situated in oak-tree rich Mid City, features several private dining rooms on the second floor of the restaurant, with seating from 10 to 200. The private dining areas include incredible, wrought-iron balconies overlooking City Park, perfect for pre-dinner cocktails and hors d’oeuvres.

The private dining rooms at Ralph’s on the Park include balconies overlooking City Park.
FACEBOOK

Antoine's Restaurant

The Mystery Room at Antoine’s got its name during Prohibition.
FACEBOOK

The Mystery Room at Antoine’s earned its name during Prohibition when the 18th Amendment prohibited the sale of alcohol, an experiment that New Orleans never took very seriously. At Antoine’s, guests in the know could venture through a door in the ladies’ room to a secret room and exit with a coffee cup full of booze. When someone asked the lucky imbiber where they got it, the response was, “It’s a mystery to me.” Just like that, the Mystery Room got its name. Now reserved for private dining, the space seats 20-50 people and is decorated with souvenirs from famous restaurants around the world and quirky items like Groucho Marx’s beret. Plenty of other dining rooms are available for both smaller and larger parties, so be sure to check the full list of offerings on the website.

The Mystery Room at Antoine’s got its name during Prohibition.
FACEBOOK

Brennan's

Private dining at Brennan’s includes the option to use the wine cellar, which is housed behind the restaurant.
Brennan’s

The Wine Room at Brennan’s lies beyond the courtyard, in a building that was once a stable at the big pink Brennan’s building that was built on 1795. It then became the restaurant’s wine cellar — dark, exclusive, and separate from the main building. Until Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group took over the restaurant and unleashed a massive renovation that put the iconic spot back on the map, diners never got near the cellar. Now it houses wines plus a private dining space for up to 16 people. In terms of decor, think leather chairs, brick walls, and a cypress table amidst bottles and bottles of wine.

Private dining at Brennan’s includes the option to use the wine cellar, which is housed behind the restaurant.
Brennan’s

The Bourbon Suites at Arnaud's

Arnaud’s Bourbon Suites
Arnaud’s

Arnaud’s is home to a dizzying maze of private dining rooms, each with its own personality — and probably its own ghosts. The quintessential New Orleans experience can be found in the Bourbon Suites, which come with a lobby; private, built-in bar; and a balcony overlooking Bourbon for all the bead-throwing needs. Each adjoining suite seats 20 people. One of the most festive times to visit is when the restaurant gets decked out for the holidays. Be sure to visit the restaurant’s own private Mardi Gras Museum, and grab a drink at the award-winning French 75 Bar. Plus, 2018 marks this restaurant’s 100th year, which is a reason in itself to celebrate in style.

Arnaud’s Bourbon Suites
Arnaud’s

Salon Restaurant

The private dining room at Salon by Sucre.
Salon by Sucre

The holidays conjure images of all things sugar plum fairies — and there’s hardly a place better than Salon by Sucre to indulge in all things sugar. The restaurant, located in the French Quarter, is an outpost of the popular macaroon and sweets shop that started on Magazine Street. The private dining room has space for 25 seated and 30 in a reception format. Complete the look with a macaroon tree centerpiece.

The private dining room at Salon by Sucre.
Salon by Sucre

The Third Floor at Seaworthy

The exterior of Seaworthy.
Alyssa Beers

The first floor with its large, marble oyster bar, and the second floor with a smaller cocktail bar are familiar territory to Seaworthy guests. Follow those curved staircases up past more candles held firm with dripped wax to the third floor, which houses the restaurant’s private dining room. It’s an intimate room fit for a ship’s captain with seating for 20.

The exterior of Seaworthy.
Alyssa Beers

The Mezzanine at Cochon

Mezzanine at Cochon
Cochon

There’s dining, and then there’s Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski dining, which can involve lots of meat and southern sides at Cochon. Why not tuck your napkin in your shirt and put your elbows on the table out of view of others, or sort of out of view of others? The new semi-private mezzanine in the Diamond Street dining room at Cochon seats up to 40.

Mezzanine at Cochon
Cochon

The Wine Cellar at Commander's Palace

Commander’s Palace

The private dining room at Commander’s Palace is as exclusive as it gets. Walk past the masses through an iron gate and down a hallway to the restaurant’s famous wine cellar, which has a table set up for dining. Expect a menu designed for the occasion for 10-14 guests, plus wine pairings. Word to the wise: Bring a sweater; wine cellars are cold.

Commander’s Palace

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