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A plate of white fish sitting in a sauce of caviar buerre blanc and topped with a ring of leaf-shaped fried potato and frisee.
Poisson a la Florentine from Mamou.
Sam Hanna/Mamou

The Hottest New Restaurants in New Orleans, January 2023

Our answer to the question: Where should I eat right now?

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Poisson a la Florentine from Mamou.
| Sam Hanna/Mamou

Every month, Eater tries to answer the oft-repeated question: Where should I eat right now? New Orleans’s steady stream of restaurant openings can make it difficult to keep track of what’s new, what’s cool, and where New Orleans’s top local chefs are cooking. To help, Eater’s heatmap tracks the city’s most exciting new restaurants, all worth a try. The below restaurants are open as of publication time, but be sure to call or check a restaurant’s social media pages before paying them a visit.

Below, are the most exciting new restaurants to check out in New Orleans this month, including a Senegalese tasting menu destination, reimagined French brasserie, and Parisian neighborhood bistro.

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Tonti's Hand French Bistro

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This neighborhood French bistro in Algiers Point is led by two local industry veterans with big-time resumes: A.J. McAlear, a former general manager and sommelier at iconic French Quarter restaurant Antoine’s, and Freddy Augustin, most recently a chef at citywide brunch destination Atchafalaya. The all-day, Parisian-style cafe serves a menu of upscale bistro classics like French onion soup, ratatouille, jambon beurre, and escargot Bourgogne.

Yakuza House

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After a year of wowing diners with hand rolls, nigiri, and katsu sandwiches out of a tiny space on Veterans Boulevard, acclaimed sushi hub Yakuza House is now in a new, larger Metairie location — now with a new menu, booze, and more dining options. Here, there are more starters, dressed nigiri pieces, and hand roll sets, as well as donburi bowls and noodle dishes. There’s a main dining room and wraparound sushi bar that seats 16, a private omakase dining room, and an izakaya room, a bar/lounge area that serves its own snack-centric menu. Yakuza House is currently open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Saturday.

A small wooden plate holding a piece of nigiri with a glass cover being lifted and smoke billowing out.
The Oyabun nigiri from Yakuza House.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Sukeban

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Oak Street’s welcome revival continues with the debut of a modern, homegrown Japanese restaurant from Jacqueline Blanchard, the founder of upscale culinary shop Coutelier. Blanchard’s shop frequently brought her to Japan, inspiring an education of traditional izakaya. The result is Sukeban, a sleek shop that serves a succinct menu of sashimi specials, rotating hand rolls, and a handful of traditional Izakaya sides, like Japanese potato salad and ohitashi, a dish of spinach, dashi, and bonito flakes, in addition to robust beer and sake offerings.

Blue crab temaki from Sukeban.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Parish Line Bistro Bar

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At the new Parish Line Bistro, an open-air rooftop and menu from chef Chris Wilson (who most recently led the kitchen at Larder Gourmet Market and before that, Emeril’s Restaurant) are the major draws. There’s a concise selection of dishes, with starters like Littleneck clams, smoked salmon bruschetta, and wagyu beef sashimi, and roasted chicken thighs over spaghetti and a lobster roll for the main course. Don’t miss the ice cream sandwich made with a Piccola Gelateria flavor of your choice.

Monday | Restaurant + Bar

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New Orleans entrepreneur Larry Morrow has brought his signature touch to Bienville Street with Monday, the new restaurant and bar he opened with his mother, chef Lenora Chong. In a surprise move announced earlier this summer, they have partnered up with local developer Sidney Torres to take over the space formerly home to pandemic-born, outdoor-centric Trep’s. Monday offers an eclectic mix of typical bar food, Creole specialties like crawfish etouffee and red beans and rice, and creative twists on Southern specialties. Bonus: The restaurant already has happy hour and weekend brunch.

Zee's Pizzeria

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New England-style pizza and pepperoni cups have landed in Uptown’s Milan neighborhood, courtesy of Zander White and his food truck-turned-restaurant. White’s pizza is thin crust, with bubbly, crispy edges and a chewy center, a mashup of Neapolitan, New York, and Connecticut styles topped with the classics — nothing too crazy goes on the pizza here. Zee’s is undoubtedly one of the best pizzas in town, and the new, inviting space serves a bigger menu of whole pies, slices, and salads, and beer and wine.

Dakar NOLA

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Serigne Mbaye’s dazzling Senegalese tasting menu dinners are now a permanent fixture in New Orleans, after holding Dakar NOLA dinners at various locations including the Southern Food and Beverage Museum (SoFab) and Mosquito Supper Club over the last two years. At the new restaurant of the same name, Mbaye serves riffs on traditional West African and Senegalese dishes, mostly gluten and dairy-free, that blend West African and Louisiana ingredients, like habanero peppers and dehydrated seafood powder with okra and red beans. Dakar NOLA holds one seating per evening for 30 guests, Wednesday through Saturday.

Dakar NOLA/Official

Flour Moon Bagels

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New Orleans now has a second dedicated bagel shop (Humble Bagels being the first) on the Lafitte Greenway — and the city is excited. Flour Moon, a pandemic-born bagel pop-up from Breanne Kostyk, was such a hit she turned it into a restaurant, serving not only bagels (everything, rosemary salt, sea salt, sesame, and poppy seed), and cream cheese (plain and scallion), but breakfast sandwiches and bagel tartines topped with all sorts of fresh herbs. vegetables, and smoked fish. Up next, bloody marys and mimosas, sure to make it a top brunch destination.

Flour Moon Bagels.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Addis Nola

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Addis NOLA’s new space on Bayou Road merits a return to the heatmap, as a significant opening that broadens the offerings of the acclaimed restaurant in a historically significant location on what used to be known as New Orleans’s Black Wall Street. Co-owner Prince Lobo and family have created a full bar and stage for the restaurant’s traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremony, a stunning interior rich with deep colors, patterns, and Ethiopian art, and a menu of stews, stir fry, and specials like whole fried red snapper and mar mitmita shrimp that is elegant as ever. A new bar program is a significant addition, courtesy of a partnership with Turning Tables.

Bright and flirty with a Parisian vibe, the highly-anticipated modern French brasserie from New Orleans chef Tom Branighan and sommelier Molly Wismeiern opened on Rampart Street in November. Branighan has created a fine-dining level menu of Louisiana ingredients prepared with French techniques, dishes like braised celery hearts with smoked beef tongue; an escargot tartlet with romesco; and red beans cassoulet with fresh made hogs head cheese. Wine plays an equal role to food here, so don’t miss the chance to try something new.

The bar at Mamou.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Miss Shirley's

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Shirley and Tang Lee, the original proprietors of Royal China in Metairie, have brought Miss Shirley’s famed cuisine to the former home of Jung’s Golden Dragon. Serving a new, smaller menu than at Royal China, Miss Shirley’s focuses on dim sum, as well as rich, brothy soups and a few Chinese-American staples. The recent refresh adds comforting blues, festive lights, and bigger tables, as dim sum is best enjoyed with a group.

Tonti's Hand French Bistro

This neighborhood French bistro in Algiers Point is led by two local industry veterans with big-time resumes: A.J. McAlear, a former general manager and sommelier at iconic French Quarter restaurant Antoine’s, and Freddy Augustin, most recently a chef at citywide brunch destination Atchafalaya. The all-day, Parisian-style cafe serves a menu of upscale bistro classics like French onion soup, ratatouille, jambon beurre, and escargot Bourgogne.

Yakuza House

After a year of wowing diners with hand rolls, nigiri, and katsu sandwiches out of a tiny space on Veterans Boulevard, acclaimed sushi hub Yakuza House is now in a new, larger Metairie location — now with a new menu, booze, and more dining options. Here, there are more starters, dressed nigiri pieces, and hand roll sets, as well as donburi bowls and noodle dishes. There’s a main dining room and wraparound sushi bar that seats 16, a private omakase dining room, and an izakaya room, a bar/lounge area that serves its own snack-centric menu. Yakuza House is currently open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Saturday.

A small wooden plate holding a piece of nigiri with a glass cover being lifted and smoke billowing out.
The Oyabun nigiri from Yakuza House.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Sukeban

Oak Street’s welcome revival continues with the debut of a modern, homegrown Japanese restaurant from Jacqueline Blanchard, the founder of upscale culinary shop Coutelier. Blanchard’s shop frequently brought her to Japan, inspiring an education of traditional izakaya. The result is Sukeban, a sleek shop that serves a succinct menu of sashimi specials, rotating hand rolls, and a handful of traditional Izakaya sides, like Japanese potato salad and ohitashi, a dish of spinach, dashi, and bonito flakes, in addition to robust beer and sake offerings.

Blue crab temaki from Sukeban.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Parish Line Bistro Bar

At the new Parish Line Bistro, an open-air rooftop and menu from chef Chris Wilson (who most recently led the kitchen at Larder Gourmet Market and before that, Emeril’s Restaurant) are the major draws. There’s a concise selection of dishes, with starters like Littleneck clams, smoked salmon bruschetta, and wagyu beef sashimi, and roasted chicken thighs over spaghetti and a lobster roll for the main course. Don’t miss the ice cream sandwich made with a Piccola Gelateria flavor of your choice.

Monday | Restaurant + Bar

New Orleans entrepreneur Larry Morrow has brought his signature touch to Bienville Street with Monday, the new restaurant and bar he opened with his mother, chef Lenora Chong. In a surprise move announced earlier this summer, they have partnered up with local developer Sidney Torres to take over the space formerly home to pandemic-born, outdoor-centric Trep’s. Monday offers an eclectic mix of typical bar food, Creole specialties like crawfish etouffee and red beans and rice, and creative twists on Southern specialties. Bonus: The restaurant already has happy hour and weekend brunch.

Zee's Pizzeria

New England-style pizza and pepperoni cups have landed in Uptown’s Milan neighborhood, courtesy of Zander White and his food truck-turned-restaurant. White’s pizza is thin crust, with bubbly, crispy edges and a chewy center, a mashup of Neapolitan, New York, and Connecticut styles topped with the classics — nothing too crazy goes on the pizza here. Zee’s is undoubtedly one of the best pizzas in town, and the new, inviting space serves a bigger menu of whole pies, slices, and salads, and beer and wine.

Dakar NOLA

Serigne Mbaye’s dazzling Senegalese tasting menu dinners are now a permanent fixture in New Orleans, after holding Dakar NOLA dinners at various locations including the Southern Food and Beverage Museum (SoFab) and Mosquito Supper Club over the last two years. At the new restaurant of the same name, Mbaye serves riffs on traditional West African and Senegalese dishes, mostly gluten and dairy-free, that blend West African and Louisiana ingredients, like habanero peppers and dehydrated seafood powder with okra and red beans. Dakar NOLA holds one seating per evening for 30 guests, Wednesday through Saturday.

Dakar NOLA/Official

Flour Moon Bagels

New Orleans now has a second dedicated bagel shop (Humble Bagels being the first) on the Lafitte Greenway — and the city is excited. Flour Moon, a pandemic-born bagel pop-up from Breanne Kostyk, was such a hit she turned it into a restaurant, serving not only bagels (everything, rosemary salt, sea salt, sesame, and poppy seed), and cream cheese (plain and scallion), but breakfast sandwiches and bagel tartines topped with all sorts of fresh herbs. vegetables, and smoked fish. Up next, bloody marys and mimosas, sure to make it a top brunch destination.

Flour Moon Bagels.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Addis Nola

Addis NOLA’s new space on Bayou Road merits a return to the heatmap, as a significant opening that broadens the offerings of the acclaimed restaurant in a historically significant location on what used to be known as New Orleans’s Black Wall Street. Co-owner Prince Lobo and family have created a full bar and stage for the restaurant’s traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremony, a stunning interior rich with deep colors, patterns, and Ethiopian art, and a menu of stews, stir fry, and specials like whole fried red snapper and mar mitmita shrimp that is elegant as ever. A new bar program is a significant addition, courtesy of a partnership with Turning Tables.

Mamou

Bright and flirty with a Parisian vibe, the highly-anticipated modern French brasserie from New Orleans chef Tom Branighan and sommelier Molly Wismeiern opened on Rampart Street in November. Branighan has created a fine-dining level menu of Louisiana ingredients prepared with French techniques, dishes like braised celery hearts with smoked beef tongue; an escargot tartlet with romesco; and red beans cassoulet with fresh made hogs head cheese. Wine plays an equal role to food here, so don’t miss the chance to try something new.

The bar at Mamou.
Randy Schmidt/Eater NOLA

Miss Shirley's

Shirley and Tang Lee, the original proprietors of Royal China in Metairie, have brought Miss Shirley’s famed cuisine to the former home of Jung’s Golden Dragon. Serving a new, smaller menu than at Royal China, Miss Shirley’s focuses on dim sum, as well as rich, brothy soups and a few Chinese-American staples. The recent refresh adds comforting blues, festive lights, and bigger tables, as dim sum is best enjoyed with a group.

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