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Trinity’s Desserts Do Not Impress Critic Tom Fitzmorris

Plus Marjie’s Grill and The Country Club reviewed

Trinity/Facebook

Tom Fitzmorris headed out to French Quarter eatery Trinity, which he found out about from a radio show caller who boasted of its cool design. It’s clear he’s digging it himself — and not just because of its looks. Trinity’s menu is “quirky, but in a way so cool that you might think you’re the offbeat element,” he says; think: fun flavor combos that seem like they shouldn’t work but definitely do. He also praises the bread as “visually arresting, a work among many of the pastry department.” That said, the post-meal sweet treat offerings do not impress. “The dessert department barely deserves to be called that,” says Fitzmorris. [CITY BUSINESS]

Helen Freund checks out Marjie’s Grill in Mid-City. Marjie’s Grill’s founders were inspired to craft their take on Southeast Asian roadside barbecue after traveling through Thailand, Vietnam and Laos. Freund gives shout-outs to sweet potatoes “that taste like candy” and a charred mushroom salad with just the right amount of heat. She’s not loving the over-the-top pork-y focus, though, saying: “even for meat lovers, the infatuation with pork can come off as overkill.” Here’s another spot that isn’t killing it with dessert. Says Freund: “Dessert appears to be a work in progress. It's a safe bet your sweet tooth won't be leading you back here.”

Freund also went to The Country Club in Bywater. She notes that the current iteration is a bit more upscale — including menu items — and refined. She loves the Brussels sprouts, which “arrive dark golden brown, the leaves fanning out into addictively crispy petals, which are equal parts crunchy and salty.” She also gives a shout-out to the tuna and burrata tartine and the Club’s spin on a Waldorf salad. The bad news? The seafood isn’t always stellar. She describes an “ill-conceived” dish of oysters and spaghetti: “The plump, sweet oysters would have been fine on their own, but the dish arrived with a pool of pastis-infused broth that made it difficult to discern any flavors beyond the overpowering scent of anise.” [GAMBIT]

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